2022 Wimbledon Championship Is Missing Some Big Names

There are some notable names absent from the official list of competitors at the 2022 Wimbledon Championships, held at the All England Tennis and Lawn Croquet Club in Southwest London. While this may rob the tournament of some of its star power, the competition is likely to be as fierce and interesting as any in recent memory.

The Championships at Wimbledon — An Overview

First held in 1877, Wimbledon is the oldest of the major tennis tournaments in the world. The first tournament was a men’s singles event that attracted 22 competitors. The tournament winner was Spencer Gore of Great Britain. It wasn’t until seven years later that the first women’s singles championship was contested. The inaugural women’s singles champion was Maud Watson, also from Great Britain.

The first non-British participant to win a major tournament at Wimbledon was American May Sutton, who accomplished the feat in 1905. Until the start of the Open era in 1969, Wimbledon was open strictly to amateur players. The event was canceled during the two World Wars as well as in 2020 during the height of the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic.

The 2022 event is the 135th iteration of the championship. It is the only one of the four major Grand Slam events that is still played on grass.

Before the Open era, no prize monies were given to any players in the tournament. At the first Open-era championship at Wimbledon, the men’s winner received 2,000 British pounds, while the women’s champion received only 750 pounds. It wasn’t until 2008 that Wimbledon awarded equal sums to the winners of the men’s and women’s events. The 2022 singles champions will win 1.7 million British pounds each for their efforts. Varying amounts of prize money are awarded depending upon the round that a player reaches before elimination.

2022’s Missing Stars

Wimbledon 2022 is missing some of the top stars of the last decade or so in both the men’s and the women’s fields. Former champions such as Venus and Serena Williams are among those not slated to appear.

Venus, 42, has won five Wimbledon singles championships in her long and storied career. While it has been 14 years since her last Wimbledon singles title, she is always a serious contender in any tournament she enters. She has also won the women’s doubles championships six times, most recently in 2016.

Her sister, Serena, has been even more successful. Serena has seven Wimbledon women’s singles wins to go along with the five doubles titles she earned with her sister. The 40-year-old also won a mixed doubles title at Wimbledon in 1998. She suffered a right leg injury in the first round at Wimbledon in 2021 and has not played in any tournaments since.

The men’s field will be missing two-time champion Rafael Nadal. The 36-year-old Spaniard announced that he is taking time off due to consistent nagging injuries. In response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in early 2022, Wimbledon officials banned any participation from Russian and Belarusian players. This means that two of the world’s top 10 ranked men’s players, Daniil Medvedev (№2) and Andrey Rublev (№7), will miss 2022’s event. Nadal has gone on record opposing this ban.

Roger Federer has said that he will not be at Wimbledon, either. Federer, 40, has won a record eight men’s singles championships at Wimbledon, but he underwent knee surgery in 2021 and is still recovering. On the plus side, Japan’s 24-year-old phenom Naomi Osaka looks to return to Wimbledon after missing 2021’s tournament due to personal issues. She has won four Grand Slam titles, but none yet at Wimbledon. Her return should draw considerable interest from the media and fans alike.

The absence of so many top players from Wimbledon may at first glance dampen overall enthusiasm about the tournament. However, without some of the top players in the world, the championships are likely to be more evenly matched. There may be new stars that emerge in the event, and they will not have to share the spotlight with the usual top players. The tournament could see final matches between players looking for their first Wimbledon championship or even their first Open title.

There are some notable names absent from the official list of competitors at the 2022 Wimbledon Championships, held at the All England Tennis and Lawn Croquet Club in Southwest London. While this may rob the tournament of some of its star power, the competition is likely to be as fierce and interesting as any in recent memory.

The Championships at Wimbledon — An Overview

First held in 1877, Wimbledon is the oldest of the major tennis tournaments in the world. The first tournament was a men’s singles event that attracted 22 competitors. The tournament winner was Spencer Gore of Great Britain. It wasn’t until seven years later that the first women’s singles championship was contested. The inaugural women’s singles champion was Maud Watson, also from Great Britain.

The first non-British participant to win a major tournament at Wimbledon was American May Sutton, who accomplished the feat in 1905. Until the start of the Open era in 1969, Wimbledon was open strictly to amateur players. The event was canceled during the two World Wars as well as in 2020 during the height of the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic.

The 2022 event is the 135th iteration of the championship. It is the only one of the four major Grand Slam events that is still played on grass.

Before the Open era, no prize monies were given to any players in the tournament. At the first Open-era championship at Wimbledon, the men’s winner received 2,000 British pounds, while the women’s champion received only 750 pounds. It wasn’t until 2008 that Wimbledon awarded equal sums to the winners of the men’s and women’s events. The 2022 singles champions will win 1.7 million British pounds each for their efforts. Varying amounts of prize money are awarded depending upon the round that a player reaches before elimination.

2022’s Missing Stars

Wimbledon 2022 is missing some of the top stars of the last decade or so in both the men’s and the women’s fields. Former champions such as Venus and Serena Williams are among those not slated to appear.

Venus, 42, has won five Wimbledon singles championships in her long and storied career. While it has been 14 years since her last Wimbledon singles title, she is always a serious contender in any tournament she enters. She has also won the women’s doubles championships six times, most recently in 2016.

Her sister, Serena, has been even more successful. Serena has seven Wimbledon women’s singles wins to go along with the five doubles titles she earned with her sister. The 40-year-old also won a mixed doubles title at Wimbledon in 1998. She suffered a right leg injury in the first round at Wimbledon in 2021 and has not played in any tournaments since.

The men’s field will be missing two-time champion Rafael Nadal. The 36-year-old Spaniard announced that he is taking time off due to consistent nagging injuries. In response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in early 2022, Wimbledon officials banned any participation from Russian and Belarusian players. This means that two of the world’s top 10 ranked men’s players, Daniil Medvedev (№2) and Andrey Rublev (№7), will miss 2022’s event. Nadal has gone on record opposing this ban.

Roger Federer has said that he will not be at Wimbledon, either. Federer, 40, has won a record eight men’s singles championships at Wimbledon, but he underwent knee surgery in 2021 and is still recovering. On the plus side, Japan’s 24-year-old phenom Naomi Osaka looks to return to Wimbledon after missing 2021’s tournament due to personal issues. She has won four Grand Slam titles, but none yet at Wimbledon. Her return should draw considerable interest from the media and fans alike.

The absence of so many top players from Wimbledon may at first glance dampen overall enthusiasm about the tournament. However, without some of the top players in the world, the championships are likely to be more evenly matched. There may be new stars that emerge in the event, and they will not have to share the spotlight with the usual top players. The tournament could see final matches between players looking for their first Wimbledon championship or even their first Open title.

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